Policy on Religion and Education

Introduction

The concept of equity is extended to the relationship between religion and education, in a way that recognizes the rich religious diversity of our land.  It provides a framework for schools to determine policies, and informs school communities about their relevant rights and responsibilities.

Values

The policy embraces initiatives in cultural rebirth (African Renaissance), moral regeneration and the promotion of values in schools.  Religion can play a significance role in preserving our heritage, respecting our diversity and building a future based on progressive values.

Our constitution and religion and education

Core constitutional value such as citizenship, human rights, equality, freedom from discrimination, and freedom of conscience, religion, thought, belief and opinion will be promoted  through: the curriculum;  extra-curricular activities; and in the way that they approach religious festivals, school uniforms and even diets.  The practices of our school will be tested against: equity; Tolerance; Diversity; openness; Accountability; and Social Honour.  It also places adequate emphasis on values and moral education.  Religion Education is about: diversity; valuing traditions; and valuing the traditions and histories of values.  These concepts are embedded in the NCS.

Religious education

Religious education describes and defines what a learner should know about religion, e.g. belief, with a view to the inculcation of adherence to that faith or belief.  Therefore, religious instruction will not be part of the formal school programme, as constituted by the National Curriculum Statement.  However, our school is encouraged to allow the use of their facilities for such programmes, in a manner that does not interrupt or detract from the core educational purposes of the school.

Religious instruction

This is about giving or receiving instruction in a particular faith or belief, with a view to the inculcation of adherence to that faith or belief.  Therefore, religious instruction will not be part of the formal school programme, as constituted by the National Curricular Statement.  However, our school is encouraged to allow the use of our facilities for such programmes, in a manner that does not interrupt or detract from the core educational purpose of the school.

Religious observances

Our school may make our facilities available for religious observances on an equitable basis.  In this instance various types of religious observances are implied: voluntary public occasions; school community (teachers and pupils) occasions; and ongoing observances e.g. dress, prayer times and diets.

Conclusion

The policy is neither negative nor hostile towards and religion or faith and does not discriminate against anyone.  Rather,  it displays a profound respect towards fish and affirms the importance of the study of religion and religious observances.

Our position

The position of the policy is to build the community in South Africa by promoting respect for our religious diversity.  The policy provides a framework for the appropriate handling of three defined aspects of religion in schools:  compulsory Religious Education regulated Religious Observances and voluntary Religious instruction.

Our school is aware of the sensitivity around the policy and wishes to point out that the rights of the pupils and teachers as set out in Section 13 and 35 of the DoE must be respected in terms of the spirit and letter of the policy.

Contact us

Phone: 081 583 0027 or
081 232 1692
Address: 91 Grindal Ave, Lavender Hill, 7945, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa